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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
're seeing it happen in great britain. the idea that scotland yard and the prime minister and, you know, journalists at "news of the world" -- >> i feel like it's people whether you read the wiki leaks things or -- you go, of course, of course, and then some of the sex scanned always, of course he was sending a pictures of himself, or you see, of course, of course they're hacking. it's one of those things like where it's your worst fear, but it keeps getting confirmed. >> what it shows me is my how tame my own formr form of journalism is. i do think for murdoch, when you talk to folks like eliot spitzer, but there's a real threat to his fcc licenses, because bribing northeastern people if you're a u.s.-based company means you have vulnerability. >> if you're not familiar, which we're all kind of learning this away, america has the law called 9 foreign corrupt practices act, which means if you do business in america, and you exhibit corrupt behavior of some kind, paying bribes, in a foreign land, so let's say you're an oil company bribing somebody in russia to get access to an oil field,
, working with its counterparts from scotland yard and the other authorities is basically monitoring their investigation to see whether or not news corp itself was involved in the allegations of the bribery. the fact that you have subsidiary companies of news corp doesn't necessarily mean that the executives themselves in fluz corp knew that this hacking was going on in london. >> other officials or a subsidiary of news corporation, that would be a skriem in tcrim sgliets. >> not necessarily. if those subsidiary companies are based in the uk, they're not going to necessarily be subject to the jurisdiction of the united states. news corp is traded on nasdaq so it's considered a u.s. corporation. if they were involved and knowledgeable of bribery of public officials in the uk, then that would be in violation of the foreign corrupt practices act. that's a felony that could be prosecuted here in the united states for that. >> very quickly because we've got to go, but you sort of wish you were still in the fbi to be investigating this kind of case? or would you just as soon let someone el
there in scotland. >>> and finally, we love our animals on this show, so take a look at a puppy with acting skills. rosy with her pal, running around like a loose wheel after two catch-me-if-you-can fly-byes. rosy gets a friendly peck on the neck and falls like a rock. is she dead? nope. s she peaks to see what her pal is doing. rosy is known for her attention-seeking antics. let's send it out to amy. a lot of fun there. >> maybe the dog had bad breath and knocked her over. that's a possibility. richard, thank you very much. bill karins is here on the plaza and i've got to say, what a beautiful morning. >> gorgeous here. not ever >>> good saturday morning. i'm chuck bell. our intense heat is not really going anywhere either. now, there will be some improvement today, we actually had a very weak cool front go through late yesterday night and as a result it will be a touch cooler today, but it will still be awfully warm. 84 already here in washington. 82 in annapolis, 81 in frederick, maryland. sunny and hot, no more than an isolated little chance if if a >>> lester's fan club all over the place her
as scotland yard alleges, murdoch's company may have broken u.s. law. >> news corp is an american corporation and they are bound by american laws regardless of where the offense takes place. >> reporter: u.s. politicians are also latching on to an unconfirmed report from an unnamed source that "news of the world" hacked phones belonging to 9/11 victims. >> anyone who did this really forget the legality, just in terms of the morality of this is just beyond the pale. >> reporter: the 9/11 allegation appeared on sunday in light of congressional concerns, we called news international, the subsidiary and they told us they have seen no evidence that those allegations are true. >> stephanie gosk in london this morning. thanks as always. martin bashir, it's good to have you here. sometimes when i have you, i like to ask the simplest question first because i like your take. you spend a lot of time as a journalist in the u.k. and here in the united states. >> i worked for the sunday times between 1984 and 1985. >> as you've watched this story unfold over the last month or so, what jumps out at you? >>
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)